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JUDUL SKRIPSI BAHASA INGGRIS YANG MASIH JARANG DIGUNAKAN SERTA LANGKA TERBARU VERSI AMINLIMPO.COM UNTUK READING, WRITING, SPEAKING DAN LISTENING / ALL SKILL / VOCABULARY/ SUB SKILL PART 3

 JUDUL SKRIPSI BAHASA INGGRIS YANG MASIH JARANG DIGUNAKAN SERTA LANGKA TERBARU VERSI AMINLIMPO.COM UNTUK READING, WRITING, SPEAKING DAN LISTENING / ALL SKILL / VOCABULARY/ SUB SKILL PART 3

Berikut 51 judul skripsi bahasa inggris yang masih jarang digunakan serta langka terbaru versi aminlimpo.com Part 3

INFO DAN FILE LENGKAPNYA KLIK DI SINI ATAU HUB 085398507498

TERSEDIA JUGA DI CHANNEL YOU TUBE PEJUANG SKRIPSI

No.

MODEL

POSSIBLE JUDUL

DESCRIPTION

SKILL

1

IN THE HOT SEAT

THE IMPROVING THE STUDENTS  (READING / WRITING)  ABILITY IN NARRATIVE TEXT THROUGH IN THE HOT SEAT  AT SMP/SMA

This creative in-role activity can be a useful tool to encourage discussion about a particular issue and share information.  A single hot seat should be placed facing the group. Alternatively, in order to facilitate more relaxed interaction between students, the hot seat might be placed in the middle of a circle

 (READING / WRITING)

2

Q NOTES

THE EFFECT OF Q NOTES  IN TEACHING (READING)  SKILL ON NARRATIVE TEXT AT SMP/SMA

Q notes are a form of graphic organiser that is useful to use with Leaving Cert students. Q notes combine two well-known and powerful methods:  SQ3R and Cornell Notes.  It is called “Q-Notes” because students write Questions in the left-hand margin. When students are preparing  for a Quiz or as revision, the Questions serves as CUES to remind them of what they need to know.

(READING)

3

BASE GROUPS

THE USE OF BASE GROUPS  IN TEACHING  (READING / WRITING)  ABILITY AT SMP/SMA

Base groups  are long term support groups that can last for  the entire year.  They can even continue into the following year.  Their primary purpose is for members to give each other assistance, encouragement and support to progress in school. They provide students with long term  positive  relationships  in school.

 (READING / WRITING)

4

READING COMPREHENSION TRIADS

THE INFLUENCE STUDENTS  (READING / WRITING)  ABILITY BY USING READING COMPREHENSION TRIADS  IN NARRATIVE TEXT AT THE SMP/SMA

This strategy works very well when the students need  to be encouraged to create high quality material to answer questions or to solve problems. It promotes higher order thinking and is ideal for generating answers to questions, exam or otherwise, in all subjects.

 (READING / WRITING)

5

BOOKENDS

THE IMPROVING THE STUDENTS  (READING / WRITING)  ABILITY IN NARRATIVE TEXT THROUGH BOOKENDS  AT SMP/SMA

This can be used before a new topic is  introduced. The  group summarises together what they already know about the subject and come up with questions they have about it. When the students have done this,  they answer questions, discuss new information and formulate any new questions they have. This can be used for any type of activity.

 (READING / WRITING)

6

INITIATING RELATIONSHIPS

THE EFFECT OF INITIATING RELATIONSHIPS  IN TEACHING (SPEAKING) SKILL ON NARRATIVE TEXT AT SMP/SMA

The purpose of this warm up is to provide opportunities for students to talk to students they don’t know and to share initial feelings and thoughts with other individuals

(SPEAKING)

7

MUDDIEST POINT

THE USE OF MUDDIEST POINT  IN TEACHING  (READING / WRITING)  ABILITY AT SMP/SMA

The purpose of this technique is to force the student to think about the material and to let you know if there is something that is unclear or confusing them about the lesson

 (READING / WRITING)

8

PPPB (POSE, PAUSE, POUNCE, BOUNCE)

THE INFLUENCE STUDENTS (READING)  ABILITY BY USING PPPB (POSE, PAUSE, POUNCE, BOUNCE)  IN NARRATIVE TEXT AT THE SMP/SMA

This  is a simple, yet sophisticated  AfL  questioning technique to help teachers move from good to  outstanding. It also helps address differentiation in the classroom and encourages teachers to slow down, take risks and tease out student understanding. It is also a useful focus for differentiating objectives and  learning experiences by varying questioning techniques.

(READING)

9

THE SITUATIONAL-STRUCTURAL APPROACH

THE IMPROVING THE STUDENTS (SPEAKING) ABILITY IN NARRATIVE TEXT THROUGH THE SITUATIONAL-STRUCTURAL APPROACH AT SMP/SMA

The origins of the Situational-Structural Approach date back to the 1920s with efforts by language teaching specialists such as Harold Palmer, A. S. Hornsby, and Michael West. The method was originally known as the Oral Method, and was an attempt to provide a more scientific alternative to the Direct Method while maintaining its emphasis on spoken language. The Oral Approach focused on syllabus design, classroom presentation, and practice of new language.

(SPEAKING)

10

THE LEXICAL APPROACH

THE EFFECT OF THE LEXICAL APPROACH IN TEACHING  (VOCABULARY)  SKILL ON NARRATIVE TEXT AT SMP/SMA

The Lexical Approach was proposed by Michael Lewis in 1993, and was based on developments in linguistics spanning the 1980s and early 90s (Lackman, 2011; Thornbury, 1998). As the name suggests, the Lexical Approach focuses on vocabulary patterns and structures (lexis), as opposed to a traditional understanding of vocabulary or grammar. In fact, Lewis viewed language as lexis with rules rather than grammar with vocabulary.

 (VOCABULARY)

11

COMPETENCY-BASED LANGUAGE TEACHING

THE USE OF COMPETENCY-BASED LANGUAGE TEACHING IN TEACHING (READING, WRITING, LISTENING, SPEAKING) ABILITY AT SMP/SMA

Competency-based language teaching (CBLT) comes from a general educational approach called competency-based education. Both refer to an output-driven view of learning intended to prepare students for specific situations and tasks. A language competence doesn’t dictate what or how to teach; it dictates the ability that is achieved after a period of instruction.

(READING, WRITING, LISTENING, SPEAKING)

12

CONTENT AND LANGUAGE INTEGRATED LEARNING

THE INFLUENCE STUDENTS (READING, WRITING, LISTENING, SPEAKING) ABILITY BY USING CONTENT AND LANGUAGE INTEGRATED LEARNING IN NARRATIVE TEXT AT THE SMP/SMA

The term Content and Language Integrated Learning, or CLIL, was first coined by David Marsh in 1994 (Pinkley, 2012). It refers to an approach that combines language teaching with academic content teaching. CLIL falls under the broader category of task-based learning, where students learn the language by doing things with it.

(READING, WRITING, LISTENING, SPEAKING)

13

AUTHOR ’S CHAIR

THE IMPROVING THE STUDENTS  (READING / WRITING)  ABILITY IN NARRATIVE TEXT THROUGH AUTHOR ’S CHAIR  AT SMP/SMA

Tompkins (2004) suggests a special chair in the classroom to be designated and labeled as the “Facilitator’s Chair” (Karelitz, 1993). Children sit on the Facilitator’s Chair to share the stories or information text they have written with classmates.

 (READING / WRITING)

14

BEFORE, DURING, AND AFTER  READING QUESTIONS STRATEGY

THE EFFECT OF BEFORE, DURING, AND AFTER  READING QUESTIONS STRATEGY  IN TEACHING (READING)  SKILL ON NARRATIVE TEXT AT SMP/SMA

Good readers generate questions before, during, and  after  reading that pertain to the text’s content, structure, and language. They also ask questions for different purposes, including those that clarify their own developing understanding.

(READING)

15

BOOKTALK

THE USE OF BOOKTALK  IN TEACHING (READING / SPEAKING) ABILITY AT SMP/SMA

Book talk is a brief teaser to interest students in particular books. A booktalk is short and simple.

(READING / SPEAKING)

16

BREAK IT DOWN

THE INFLUENCE STUDENTS (READING)  ABILITY BY USING BREAK IT DOWN  IN NARRATIVE TEXT AT THE SMP/SMA

Break It Down strategy is  breaking  down big questions into smaller questions that can lead students to answer the big question. It is also simplifying hard concepts to help students understand. The strategy can be used for both fiction and nonfiction texts.

(READING)

17

CAUSE/EFFECT 

THE IMPROVING THE STUDENTS (READING)  ABILITY IN NARRATIVE TEXT THROUGH CAUSE/EFFECT   AT SMP/SMA

Facilitators make decisions about how to present information to readers. They choose from a variety of structures to organize information for readers. Cause and effect may be found in fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and plays. Sometimes a single incident (cause) can lead to multiple effects. Other times multiple causes can lead to a single effect.

(READING)

18

CHARACTER MAPPING

THE EFFECT OF CHARACTER MAPPING  IN TEACHING (READING)  SKILL ON NARRATIVE TEXT AT SMP/SMA

Through character mapping students examine the traits of characters from their favorite books and learn how to distinguish between factual character traits presented directly in the story and character traits that readers infer from the story. Students can do character mapping for both fictional and real characters in books. 

(READING)

19

CHRONOLOGICAL SEQUENCE (TIME/ORDER)

THE USE OF CHRONOLOGICAL SEQUENCE (TIME/ORDER)  IN TEACHING (READING)  ABILITY AT SMP/SMA

Facilitators make decisions about how to present information to readers. They choose from a variety of structures to organize information for readers. In chronological sequence  text structure, events are  put in order in which they occur in time. It is important to teach students chronological sequence text structure using both fiction and nonfiction texts.

(READING)

20

CHUNK THE TEXT

THE INFLUENCE STUDENTS (READING)  ABILITY BY USING CHUNK THE TEXT  IN NARRATIVE TEXT AT THE SMP/SMA

Chunk the text is a strategy wherein the text is broken into shorter and more manageable units (meaningful chunks).  Depending on the text, such as genre, length, structure, and type, a text can be chunked into paragraphs, stanza, scene, section, chapter, page, line, or sentence segments.

(READING)

21

COMPARE AND CONTRAST

THE IMPROVING THE STUDENTS (READING)  ABILITY IN NARRATIVE TEXT THROUGH COMPARE AND CONTRAST  AT SMP/SMA

Facilitators make decisions about how to present information to readers. They choose from a variety of structures to organize information for readers. Compare and contrast strategies are ways of looking at characters or objects and thinking about how they are similar (alike) and different. Fiction and nonfiction can be used for compare and contrast lesson.

(READING)

22

CONCEPT SORT

THE EFFECT OF CONCEPT SORT  IN TEACHING  (READING, VOCABULARY)  SKILL ON NARRATIVE TEXT AT SMP/SMA

Concept Sort is a vocabulary and comprehension strategy used to familiarize students with the vocabulary of a new topic or book. The teacher provides a list of terms or concepts and the kids place words into different categories. This strategy can be used before reading with individuals, small groups, or whole class.

 (READING, VOCABULARY)

23

DISCUSSION WEB

THE USE OF DISCUSSION WEB  IN TEACHING (READING)  ABILITY AT SMP/SMA

A Discussion Web is a graphic aid for teaching students to look at both sides of an issue before drawing conclusions. It can be either a pre-reading or pre-writing activity, not just as a post-reading strategy. It requires students to work in cooperative learning groups, not alone.

(READING)

24

ECHO READING

THE INFLUENCE STUDENTS (READING)  ABILITY BY USING ECHO READING  IN NARRATIVE TEXT AT THE SMP/SMA

Echo reading is a teacher-led strategy designed to help students develop expressive, fluent reading. The teacher reads a short segment of text, such as a sentence or phrase, and the student echoes back the same sentence or phrase while following along the text.

(READING)

25

EXPLORING POETIC ELEMENTS

THE IMPROVING THE STUDENTS (READING)  ABILITY IN NARRATIVE TEXT THROUGH EXPLORING POETIC ELEMENTS  AT SMP/SMA

Poetic elements are literary devices used in poetry  such as rhyme, alliteration, onomatopoeia.  By exploring poetic elements students learn how to “read” and “enjoy” poetry.

(READING)

26

FIVE SENSES STORY READING

THE EFFECT OF FIVE SENSES STORY READING  IN TEACHING (READING)  SKILL ON NARRATIVE TEXT AT SMP/SMA

Five Senses Story Reading focuses on encouraging students to use their five senses in order to relate meaningfully to text.

(READING)

27

IDENTIFY AND ANALYZE TEXT STRUCTURE

THE USE OF IDENTIFY AND ANALYZE TEXT STRUCTURE  IN TEACHING (READING)  ABILITY AT SMP/SMA

Facilitators use a variety of structures to organize the information for readers. Readers are led to understand, identify, and analyze the structure of a text in order to process that text. 

(READING)

28

INFORMATION GATHERING TECHNIQUE

THE INFLUENCE STUDENTS  (READING / WRITING)  ABILITY BY USING INFORMATION GATHERING TECHNIQUE  IN NARRATIVE TEXT AT THE SMP/SMA

Information gathering is essential to the learning process. It is important for students to learn the information gathering process as they listen and look at varied resources, seeking information pertinent to the questions they are asking. Through information gathering students are invited to closely read a text or its illustrations to meet a specific reading or writing purpose.

 (READING / WRITING)

29

JUMP IN AND READ

THE IMPROVING THE STUDENTS (READING)  ABILITY IN NARRATIVE TEXT THROUGH JUMP IN AND READ  AT SMP/SMA

Jump In and Read is similar to popcorn reading where students are encouraged to jump in at any time during the class read aloud. Students take turns in reading the text and follow four rules.

(READING)

30

KEY IDEAS AND DETAILS

THE EFFECT OF KEY IDEAS AND DETAILS  IN TEACHING (READING)  SKILL ON NARRATIVE TEXT AT SMP/SMA

Identifying main idea and supporting details is an important part of reading comprehension. The main idea is the central point the facilitator tries to make. Supporting details are information in the text that helps explain and prove and facilitator’s point.

(READING)

31

MAKING WORDS STRATEGY

THE USE OF MAKING WORDS STRATEGY  IN TEACHING  (SPEAKING, VOCABULARY)  ABILITY AT SMP/SMA

Making words is a strategy in which students arrange letter cards, tiles, or squares to spell words. Teachers choose key words from books students are reading that use particular phonics or spelling patterns for students to practice. Then, using a set of letter cards, tiles, or squares students manipulate the letters to form a variety of words conforming to the phonics or spelling patterns. (Tompkins, 2004, pp. 64-66)

 (SPEAKING, VOCABULARY)

32

MEETING OF THE MINDS TECHNIQUE

THE INFLUENCE STUDENTS (SPEAKING) ABILITY BY USING MEETING OF THE MINDS TECHNIQUE  IN NARRATIVE TEXT AT THE SMP/SMA

Meeting of the minds technique is a comprehension strategy of evaluating. Students learn how to evaluate information by acting out the opposing views of two or more characters in an oral debate or interview format.

(SPEAKING)

33

PICTURE WALK

THE IMPROVING THE STUDENTS (READING)  ABILITY IN NARRATIVE TEXT THROUGH PICTURE WALK  AT SMP/SMA

Picture Walk  is a strategy  of “walking” students through a picture book and calling attention to the pictures/illustrations in the book to tell the story. It is previewing the pictures in a storybook to familiarize the child with the story prior to reading the text.

(READING)

34

POINT OF VIEW

THE EFFECT OF POINT OF VIEW  IN TEACHING (READING)  SKILL ON NARRATIVE TEXT AT SMP/SMA

Point of View refers to how a person or character looks at, or views, an object or a situation.

(READING)

35

PRINT CONCEPTS

THE USE OF PRINT CONCEPTS  IN TEACHING (READING / SPEAKING) ABILITY AT SMP/SMA

Print concepts are early literacy skills required for developing basic understanding of written language. It is the understanding of the elements of a book and the mechanics of text—that print tells a story, that it flows from left to right and from top to bottom, that individual words on the page correspond to individual spoken words.

(READING / SPEAKING)

36

PROBLEM AND SOLUTION

THE INFLUENCE STUDENTS (READING)  ABILITY BY USING PROBLEM AND SOLUTION  IN NARRATIVE TEXT AT THE SMP/SMA

Facilitators make decisions about how to present information to readers. They choose from a variety of structures to organize information for readers. The problem and solution text structure presents a problem, and show how it has been solved or can be solved.

(READING)

37

READERS’ WORKSHOP

THE IMPROVING THE STUDENTS (READING)  ABILITY IN NARRATIVE TEXT THROUGH READERS’ WORKSHOP  AT SMP/SMA

Readers’ Workshop is a framework for reading instruction and practice in the classroom.   In  Readers’ Workshop students are provided with strategy instruction, guidance and independent practice to facilitate reading development.

(READING)

38

SEQUENCING STRUCTURE

THE EFFECT OF SEQUENCING STRUCTURE  IN TEACHING (READING)  SKILL ON NARRATIVE TEXT AT SMP/SMA

Sequencing is putting events or actions in order. An example is chronological order, which is common with historical events and literary stories. Another example is ordering of steps to carry out procedures such as  instructions, directions, recipes, and manuals. Time life cycle also uses a sequencing format.

(READING)

39

SHARE WHO SAID THAT

THE USE OF SHARE WHO SAID THAT  IN TEACHING (SPEAKING, LISTENING) ABILITY AT SMP/SMA

Share Who Said That is a  fun  speaking and listening activity. Students become conscious of having to listen to what their classmates are saying because they might be asked to Share Who Said That.

(SPEAKING, LISTENING)

40

UNDERSTANDING STORY ELEMENTS

THE INFLUENCE STUDENTS (READING)  ABILITY BY USING UNDERSTANDING STORY ELEMENTS  IN NARRATIVE TEXT AT THE SMP/SMA

Story elements make up the structure of a story. These are the setting, characters, plot, and theme

(READING)

41

USING SENTENCE FRAMES 

THE IMPROVING THE STUDENTS (SPEAKING , WRITING, VOCABULARY) ABILITY IN NARRATIVE TEXT THROUGH USING SENTENCE FRAMES   AT SMP/SMA

Sentence frames are sentences with pieces missing like a fill-in-the-blanks structure. Using sentence frames is a vocabulary strategy particularly for students struggling with language in content areas. Sentence frame is a structure for speaking or writing.

(SPEAKING , WRITING, VOCABULARY)

42

USING WORDS YOU KNOW

THE EFFECT OF USING WORDS YOU KNOW  IN TEACHING  (SPEAKING, VOCABULARY)  SKILL ON NARRATIVE TEXT AT SMP/SMA

Using Words You Know is an activity designed to help students learn to use the words they already know to decode and spell other words.

 (SPEAKING, VOCABULARY)

43

WRITERS’ WORKSHOP

THE USE OF WRITERS’ WORKSHOP  IN TEACHING (WRITING) ABILITY AT SMP/SMA

Writers’ Workshop is a framework for writing instruction and practice in the classroom. In Writers Workshop students are provided with strategy instruction and guidance to facilitate writing development.

(WRITING)

44

ABC BRAINSTORMING

THE INFLUENCE STUDENTS  (READING / WRITING)  ABILITY BY USING ABC BRAINSTORMING  IN NARRATIVE TEXT AT THE SMP/SMA

Using the ABC brainstorming strategy with students midway through a unit provides you with information about what students have learned about a particular topic. Working individually, in pairs, in small groups, or as a class, students brainstorm words or phrases that begin with each letter of the alphabet and are related to the current unit of study.

 (READING / WRITING)

45

ANALOGIES

THE IMPROVING THE STUDENTS  (READING / WRITING)  ABILITY IN NARRATIVE TEXT THROUGH ANALOGIES  AT SMP/SMA

A useful formative assessment strategy is to ask students to create an analogy between something they are familiar with and the new information they have learned. When asked to create an analogy for an atom, students may come up with an atom being like a community.

 (READING / WRITING)

46

CHORAL RESPONSE

THE EFFECT OF CHORAL RESPONSE  IN TEACHING (READING)  SKILL ON NARRATIVE TEXT AT SMP/SMA

If you need a quick assessment of student understanding, ask students to respond to a series of questions “as a class.” If you listen carefully to the number and content of responses, you will get a good idea of whether or not the students are clear on what you are presenting. Choral response encourages all students to be actively engaged in the assessment process.

(READING)

47

FIST OF FIVE

THE USE OF FIST OF FIVE  IN TEACHING (READING)  ABILITY AT SMP/SMA

When you need a quick, immediate assessment, the fist of five is a great strategy. Ask your students a question and have them respond by showing you their level of understanding. Students hold up one finger if they are still unsure of a topic and need to be provided with more information

(READING)

48

OPEN-ENDED QUESTIONS

THE INFLUENCE STUDENTS (READING)  ABILITY BY USING OPEN-ENDED QUESTIONS  IN NARRATIVE TEXT AT THE SMP/SMA

Using open-ended questions allows you to determine the depth and breadth of student learning. Ask students questions that cannot be answered with “yes” or “no” or another one word answer. Open-ended questions require students to think about their answers and use their knowledge and understanding about a topic in their responses.

(READING)

49

PLACEMATS

THE IMPROVING THE STUDENTS  (READING / WRITING)  ABILITY IN NARRATIVE TEXT THROUGH PLACEMATS  AT SMP/SMA

The placemat strategy is an enjoyable activity for students and provides you with information about their current level of understanding. Provide each group of four or five students with a large sheet of paper. In the middle of the paper write the topic or target question. Students divide the paper up so they each have a section to write in and there is room in the middle to summarize their responses. Students individually write or draw to demonstrate their understanding of the topic or target question in their area of the placemat.

 (READING / WRITING)

50

REFLECTION JOURNALS

THE EFFECT OF REFLECTION JOURNALS  IN TEACHING  (READING / WRITING)  SKILL ON NARRATIVE TEXT AT SMP/SMA

Reflection journals are a type of journal that encourages students to think about what they have learned and make connections to their own lives. Reading through the entries that students create gives you information that can be used to plan future lessons.

 (READING / WRITING)

51

REPEAT PRE-ASSESSMENTS

THE USE OF REPEAT PRE-ASSESSMENTS  IN TEACHING  (READING / WRITING)  ABILITY AT SMP/SMA

Another way to formatively assess your students is to repeat a pre-assessment strategy you used at the beginning of a unit of study. At the start of a unit on ecosystems, you may have asked your students to create a web or write a one-minute essay on ecosystems. Midway through the unit, repeat the strategy you used to collect pre-assessment data.

 (READING / WRITING)

 


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